The Resurrection According to St. Paul

Jesus Christ is Risen!  Alleluia!

As we continue to bask in the joy of the Easter season, I thought it would be appropriate to reflect on St. Paul’s teachings on the Resurrection of Christ.  St. Paul himself powerfully encountered the Risen Christ on the Road to Damascus, and this encounter changed his identity and mission forever.  St. Paul has left us a treasury of teachings on the Resurrection itself and the profound consequences for the human family and for each of us in our own lives.

The first of Paul’s powerful passages comes in his letter to the Romans where he speaks of Christ as the New Adam who reverses the sin and death of Adam.  Through the mystery of his death and Resurrection, Christ brings life and grace to all:

Therefore, just as through one person sin entered the world, and through sin, death, and thus death came to all, inasmuch as all sinned–

for up to the time of the law, sin was in the world, though sin is not accounted when there is no law.

But death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over those who did not sin after the pattern of the trespass of Adam, who is the type of the one who was to come.

But the gift is not like the transgression. For if by that one person’s transgression the many died, how much more did the grace of God and the gracious gift of the one person Jesus Christ overflow for the many.

And the gift is not like the result of the one person’s sinning. For after one sin there was the judgment that brought condemnation; but the gift, after many transgressions, brought acquittal.

For if, by the transgression of one person, death came to reign through that one, how much more will those who receive the abundance of grace and of the gift of justification come to reign in life through the one person Jesus Christ. (Rm 5:15-17)

For Paul, just as the disobedience of Adam brought death to all, the obedience of Christ through his death brings life to all in the Resurrection.   In the same way that Original sin affected all of humanity, the Resurrection changes and elevates the entire human family to a dignity beyond measure.  Thus, Easter morning is truly the dawn of a new humanity, a new creation transformed and alive in Christ.  What then, are the true consequences of the Resurrection of Christ?  Paul concludes with this powerful passage:

What then shall we say to this? If God is for us, who can be against us?

He who did not spare his own Son but handed him over for us all, how will he not also give us everything else along with him?

Who will bring a charge against God’s chosen ones? It is God who acquits us.

Who will condemn? It is Christ Jesus who died, rather, was raised, who also is at the right hand of God, who indeed intercedes for us.

What will separate us from the love of Christ? Will anguish, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or the sword?

For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor present things, nor future things, nor powers,

nor height, nor depth,nor any other creature will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. (Romans 8:31-35; 38-39)

Therefore, if Christ is truly raised from the dead and has truly defeated sin and death, then what do we have to be afraid of?   This message is particularly important for us to remember this Easter as we presently face many moral, economic, and foreign threats in our world today. We need to remember that ultimately Jesus Christ is victorious, and nothing can separate us from the love of Christ.   We must also be convicted that we must work diligently to live and preach the gospel in our own lives in order to bring about Christ’s victory and not allow worry, stress, greed, or indifference to rob us of our share in the salvation of Christ.

We also see St. Paul’s most explicit and developed teaching on the Resurrection of Christ in his First Letter to the Corinthians.  Paul was writing his letter to the Church in Corinth to correct both liturgical abuse and doctrinal error.   One of the dangerous heresies circulating around Corinth was a denial of the resurrection of the dead.  Paul forcefully corrects this error explaining the consequences of such a teaching:

But if Christ is preached as raised from the dead, how can some among you say there is no resurrection of the dead? If there is no resurrection of the dead, then neither has Christ been raised.

And if Christ has not been raised, then empty (too) is our preaching; empty, too, your faith.

Then we are also false witnesses to God, because we testified against God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if in fact the dead are not raised.

For if the dead are not raised, neither has Christ been raised,

and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is vain; you are still in your sins.

Then those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished.

If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are the most pitiable people of all. (1 Corinthians 15:12-19)

Paul then teaches us the reality of the Resurrection:  that Christ is truly alive and has destroyed sin and death forever and that the mystery of the Resurrection transforms us from being dead to sin to being alive in Christ and complete sharers in his victory over death:

Behold, I tell you a mystery. We shall not all fall asleep, but we will all be changed,

in an instant, in the blink of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, the dead will be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.

For that which is corruptible must clothe itself with incorruptibility, and that which is mortal must clothe itself with immortality.

And when this which is corruptible clothes itself with incorruptibility and this which is mortal clothes itself with immortality, then the word that is written shall come about: “Death is swallowed up in victory.

Where, O death, is your victory? Where, O death, is your sting?”

The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law.

But thanks be to God who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Corinthians 51-57)

Thus, the Resurrection is at the very heart of the Christian faith.   If Christ is not truly risen, then all is in vain.   However, our hope as Christians lies precisely in that Christ is alive and is present and working in and through the Church.   Our task is to live as if Christ is truly risen!   Do we really believe that Christ is risen and has truly conquered sin and death?   Do our lives truly reflect this?  St. Paul challenges us to vibrantly live our lives alive in Christ:

If then you were raised with Christ, seek what is above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God.

Think of what is above, not of what is on earth.

For you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God.

When Christ your life appears, then you too will appear with him in glory.

Put to death, then, the parts of you that are earthly: immorality, impurity, passion, evil desire, and the greed that is idolatry.

Put on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, heartfelt compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience, bearing with one another and forgiving one another, if one has a grievance against another; as the Lord has forgiven you, so must you also do.

And over all these put on love, that is, the bond of perfection.

And let the peace of Christ control your hearts, the peace into which you were also called in one body. And be thankful.

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, as in all wisdom you teach and admonish one another, singing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God.

And whatever you do, in word or in deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. (Colossians 3:1-5;12-17)

May we, through the intercession of St. Paul, encounter anew the life and grace of the Risen Christ and become more effective witnesses of the truth of the Resurrection.  It is only through the grace, power, and conviction of the Resurrection that we can be the instruments that transform our culture into a culture of life and civilization of love so that all may come to know fullness of life in Christ.   Happy Easter!

 

Leave a reply